Romancing Ibn Battuta Mall

IBN Battuta Mall

Whoever said money can’t buy happiness simply didn’t know where to go shopping.

~Bo Derek

 

Dubai prides itself to be the shopping destination of the world. I couldn’t agree more, from golds, jewelries, fabrics, shoes, bags and car deals, name it and they got it at an incredible bargain prices.

Dubai’s world-renowned malls boast a number of features that takes the title “shopping paradise” into a whole new different level to most travellers and shoppers.

 

Beth and the Elephant Clock at India Court

Perhaps 3 notable malls during my stay are the Dubai Mall, Mall of Emirates and Ibn Battuta Mall. The Dubai Mall is the world’s largest shopping mall, which operates the Guinness World Record Holder, Dubai Aquarium and Underwater Zoo. Yes, my jaw dropped at the sight of it. I was in awe seeing the underwater world in a massive aquarium tank.

The Mall of Emirates features an indoor ski resort. The daring ones can try the tow lift to get to the 60-meter high indoor mountain with  variety of slopes to choose from.

My favourite mall of all is Ibn  Battuta Mall nestled adjacent to Sheikh Zayed Road in Dubai. It showcases multi-cultural elements that accentuates the six courts: China, India, Persia, Egypt, Tunisia and Andalusia.

So on one summer night and nothing to do… we were surprised by an invitation to cool down at this fancy mall. Along came Tito, our hero who fits us all in his small car and rescued us from an uneventful evening.

The Mall is named after one of the greatest travellers of all time, Ibn Battuta. He sets off to journey the world at a young age of 20, marking a distance surpassing his near-contemporary Marco Polo.

Trading ships at China Court

The colourful China Court exhibits chinese elements like dragons, floral patterns, gold trimmings. It’s main feature is the massive display of a Chinese Junk, a native sailing vessel used as either trading ship or warship.

The India Court features an accurate re-creation of the Elephant Clock from the greatest Muslim inventor of all time, Al-Jazari. The ornately carved dome in the main court was inspired by the one at the Taj Mahal Mosque.

Persia Court is adorned with arabesque ornamented dome. I fell in love with this persian inspired architecture that I told myself to visit a  turkish mosque someday. The new starbucks lounge sits below this impressive dome. Now, it makes my itching feet to go look for work there… now.

The magnificent display of persian chandeliers contrasted beautifully at this intricate Persia  Court

Egypt Court offers visitors to experience a historic splendour with its intricately decorated walls and ceilings. The travels of Ibn Battuta is recaptured in this court. Brass lanterns depicts the lively Egyptian atmosphere.

The carvings at the sandstone gate and the bazaar atmosphere at Egypt Court

Tunisia Court displays a village like theme, with it’s dome painted with bright blue-sky ceiling. It features Moroccan inspired tiles with street lamps and lanterns to lit up the entire street of whitewashed stucco buildings.

bright lights and blue sky at Tunisia Court

Andalusia Court was inspired by Alhambra Palace in Granada. It’s central feature is a towering lion fountain. This water-feature is composed of six lions in an elevated marble columns.  From the outside, the terracotta tile roof gives a Spanish feel into a heavily decorated dome. Watch out for gliders and a flying man on display at the minor courts.

 the flying man at Andalusia Court

Pardon the picture heavy post and the low quality as these are all taken in a pre-SLR era   :-P

This post makes me crave to hit the road and get my feet on my next travel and shopping destination.

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Haven Hunter -Weekend Haven

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2 Comments

  • Reply Brock - Backpack With Brock March 9, 2012 at 3:21 am

    Hard to believe all that stuff is in a mall! Nice pictures.

    • havenhunter
      Reply havenhunter March 10, 2012 at 4:09 pm

      thanks brocks. the interior of the mall is well thought, as visitor I felt I was walking into a different culture from court to court.

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